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Releases of oil and hazardous materials are regulated separately under the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). However, both mandate the development of contingency plans, and there is significant overlap in the type and scope of information required to do so. In order to minimize confusion and maximize resources, the two contingency plans are combined in this document as an Integrated Contingency Plan (RCP/ACP). In order to meet some of the requirements of OPA, subarea plans are developed separately, but will be referenced in this RCP/ACP.

This RCP/ACP fulfills the requirements of Sections 300.210(b) and (c) of the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) and Section 311(j)(4) of the Clean Water Act (CWA), as well as relevant portions of the National Response Framework, particularly Emergency Support Function #10—Hazardous Materials (ESF #10). The RCP/ACP is designed to coordinate Timely and effective response among

  • local, Tribal, and State officials;
  • private industry;
  • On-Scene Coordinators (OSCs);
  • Remedial Project Managers (RPMs);
  • various Federal Agencies; and
  • other organizations

to minimize damage resulting from releases of oil or hazardous substances, pollutants or contaminants.

The plan describes response protocols and assists in providing a coordinated response capability in the event of a release or spill that poses a threat to the environment or to human health and welfare.

The initial actions taken by the OSC and/or other appropriate personnel should be to determine whether proper response actions have already been initiated. In general, if the party or parties responsible for the release or spill do not take appropriate actions, or if the party or parties responsible for the release or spill are unknown, the local response community or State agencies will become involved. If Federal assistance is requested or required, the OSC shall respond, implement provisions of the NCP and applicable agency guidance, and coordinate activities as outlined in this RCP/ACP.

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The RCP is developed pursuant to Sections 300.210 of the NCP. The NCP is required by Section 105 of CERCLA, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), by Section 311(d) of CWA, as amended by OPA. The ESF 10 components of this plan are required by the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Act (Public Law 93-288), as amended. The RCP is applicable to response actions taken pursuant to the authorities under CERCLA, Section 311 of CWA, and OPA. The NCP requires establishment of RRTs, which are responsible for Regional planning and preparedness activities before response actions, and for providing advice and support to the RRT when activated during a response.

To accomplish the coordinated planning structure envisioned under OPA, the CWA requires the President to designate specific Areas for which Area Committees (ACs) are established. Each AC, under the direction of an OSC, must prepare and submit to the President for approval an ACP that, in conjunction with the NCP, is adequate to remove a worst case discharge (WCD) from a vessel or facility operating in or near that Area. This RCP/ACP and its associated subarea contingency plans (SACPs) identify the various response strategies that have proven to be effective in controlling and mitigating the impact of a discharge or release and evaluates WCDs. The SACPs, which are incorporated into this RCP/ACP by reference, also include likely discharge scenarios from vessels, onshore facilities, and offshore facilities operating in or near the Region 5 Area.

To meet the requirements of the CWA and EPA’s regulations at 40 C.F.R. § 300.210, this RCP/ACP includes the following:

  1. (I) A description of the area covered by the plan, including the areas of special economic or environmental importance that might be damaged by a discharge;
  2. (ii) A description in detail of the responsibilities of an owner or operator and of federal, state, and local agencies in removing a discharge, and in mitigating or preventing a substantial threat of a discharge;
  3. (iii) A list of equipment (including firefighting equipment), dispersants, or other mitigating substances and devices, and personnel available to an owner or operator and federal, state, and local agencies, to ensure an effective and immediate removal of a discharge, and to ensure mitigation or prevention of a substantial threat of a discharge (this may be provided in an appendix or by reference to other relevant emergency plans (e.g. state or LEPC plans), which may include such equipment lists);
  4. (iv) A description of procedures to be followed for obtaining an expedited decision regarding the use of dispersants; and
  5. (v) A detailed description of how the plan is integrated into other ACPs and tank vessel, offshore facility, and onshore facility response plans approved by the President, and into operating procedures of the NSFCC.

Through Executive Order 12777, the President delegated to the Administrator of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) responsibility for designating the Areas and appointing the committees for the inland zone as designated in the NCP. The Administrator further delegated this authority to the US EPA Regional Administrators, and designated the 10 pre-existing RRT areas as the Areas for OPA planning purposes. US EPA Region 5, which consists of Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin, is one Area. Establishment of the Area Committee is required by Section 311(j)(4) of CWA.As set forth in the NCP at § 300.115, the RRT is responsible for revising the RCP as needed and for recommending changes to the ACP.

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It is the policy of the RRT that response actions on non-Federal lands should be monitored or implemented by the most immediate level of government with authority and capability to conduct such activities. The first level of response will generally be the responsible party (RP), followed by local government agencies, followed by State agencies when local capabilities are exceeded. When incident response is beyond the capability of the State response, US EPA or USCG is authorized to take response measures deemed necessary to protect the public health or welfare or the environment from discharges of oil or releases of hazardous substances, pollutants, or contaminants. The need for Federal response is based on evaluation by the Federal OSC.

The US EPA Region 5 RCP/ACP has been developed in accordance with the NCP and takes into consideration relevant USCG area contingency plans. The Ninth Coast Guard District is covered by five area contingency plans, which cover portions of Region 5. Each plan covers the coastal zone of the corresponding sector or Marine Safety Unit. Each USCG area contingency plan is developed by an area committee chaired by the respective Coast Guard Captain-of-the-Port.

USCG has five ACPs that cover, in part, how to respond to an oil or hazardous substance spill in the coastal zone of the Great Lakes and their connecting channels. This includes the identification, prioritization and cleanup strategies for sensitive areas; and identification of contractors and equipment. While US EPA has chosen to combine its Area Contingency Plan for Region 5 into the existing Regional Contingency Plan to produce this joint document, the USCG’s five area contingency plans are separate documents, which are compatible with and may be used in conjunction with this ICP for spills that impact both the inland and coastal zones. The ACP referred to in this Plan is the US EPA Inland Plan unless otherwise stated. This plan applies to the Region 5 RRT (RRT5) member agencies (see Appendix I).

The RCP/ACP, when implemented in conjunction with other provisions of the NCP, shall be adequate to remove a worst case discharge and to mitigate or prevent a substantial threat of such a discharge.

The RCP portion of this plan covers response for all of Region 5, but the ACP portion of this plan only covers the inland portion. When reading the plan, if the jurisdiction falls in the coastal zone, the spill will fall under the responsibility of the Coast Guard and will only be subject to the RCP components of this plan. If a jurisdiction is in the inland zone, both ACP and RCP components of this plan apply.

Certain groups of counties have been designated as sub areas of the RCP/ACP and will be appended to the plan. They are chosen based on specific criteria for threat:

  • proximity to large bodies of water
  • number of facilities
  • need for greater jurisdictional coordination

They may also contain portions of other adjacent areas to provide for a coordinated plan for spills affecting certain boundary locations.

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Region 5 has been divided into two operational areas, inland and coastal, which correspond to the areas in which EPA and USCG are responsible for providing OSCs. The coastal operational area consists of the open waters of the Great Lakes, including Lake St. Clair, the interconnecting rivers, major bays, ports and harbors of the Region 5 States, and the land surface, land substrata, ground water and ambient air proximal to those waters. The inland operational area includes all other land territory of the six States of Region 5, including each State’s inland lakes and rivers. Numerous Native American community reservations and treaty rights areas are also delineated within Region 5.

Two Coast Guard Districts share Federal Region 5. The Ninth Coast Guard District, headquartered in Cleveland, serves the Great Lakes drainage basin. The Eighth Coast Guard District, headquartered in New Orleans, serves the drainage basins of the upper Mississippi and the Ohio Rivers. The boundary between USCG District 8 and USCG District 9 is at River Mile 187.3 on the Illinois River.

Within the Great Lakes coastal zone, the appropriate Captain of the Port (COTP) functions as the predesignated OSC for all oil and hazardous substance releases, subject to a DOT/EPA redelegation of certain CERCLA response authorities. EPA performs the following two categories of response actions within the coastal zone: 1) remedial actions for releases originating from facilities, and 2) all response actions for releases originating from hazardous waste management facilities.

The scope of the Eighth Coast Guard District response role is defined by a revised Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between the District and EPA Region 5, signed by the Rear Admiral and Regional Administrator on March 15, 2017. The revised MOU assigns EPA as the predesignated OSC for the entire inland zone, including the inland river system within the Eighth Coast Guard District, for responding to all discharges of oil and hazardous substances. The USCG responds to spills from commercial vessels only.

DOD or DOE provides OSCs for all response actions for releases of hazardous substances, pollutants or contaminants which originate on any facility or vessel under the jurisdiction, custody or control of DOD or DOE. In the case of a Federal agency other than US EPA, USCG, DOD or DOE, such agency shall provide OSCs for removal actions necessitated by releases originating on any facility or vessel under its jurisdiction that are not emergencies.

EPA or USCG OSCs may be requested to provide technical assistance to the lead agency OSC who is responding to the release or threatened release. In the event of an emergency on Federal agency property other than DOD or DOE, EPA or USCG retains response authority and EPA OSCs may respond and later initiate cost recovery actions against the potential responsible party.

Definitions of the boundaries of OSC jurisdictions for Region 5 are provided in the following subsections. Where highways are used to delineate the boundary, the roadbed right-of-ways of the highway are included in the inland (US EPA) zone.

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The following sections describe the areas from which each Region will provide OSCs for investigating and responding to releases.

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EPA Region 3 will provide OSCs for investigating and responding to releases to the main stem of the Ohio River from the Ohio-Pennsylvania boundary, mile 40.1, to the Kentucky-West Virginia boundary, mile 317.2. All releases in the above-named stretch of the Ohio River emanating from sources in West Virginia will be handled by EPA Region 3 personnel; those from sources in Region 5 will be handled by Region 5 personnel. If either RRT is activated, the Eighth USCG District would be involved along the entire stretch of the Ohio River.

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EPA Region 4 will provide OSCs for investigating and responding to releases of oil or hazardous materials to the main stem of the Ohio River from the Kentucky-West Virginia boundary, mile 317.2, to its junction with the Mississippi River, mile 981.2. Releases in the above-named stretch of the Ohio River emanating from shoreline sources in EPA Region 4 will be handled by personnel of Region 4; spills from shoreline sources in Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois will be handled by personnel from Region 5.

Region 4 will have the responsibility for ensuring notification of water users downstream of the location of the release, including coordination with The Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO), the USCG Eighth District and USACE, when a release occurs on the south shoreline or in the main stream of the Ohio River. Region 5 has a like responsibility, including coordination with ORSANCO, the USCG Eighth District, and USACE when a release occurs on the north shoreline of the river. Either Region, when requested by the other, may assume the functional OSC role for a particular incident. The decision to accept this responsibility will rest with the Region being requested on an incident-specific basis. Boundary lines do not preclude mutual assistance between the two agencies.

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EPA Region 7 will provide OSCs for investigating and responding to releases to the main stem of the Upper Mississippi River (UMR) when either Iowa or Missouri is the principal first responding State. EPA Region 5 will have jurisdiction for such releases within the State of Minnesota and where Minnesota, Wisconsin, or Illinois is the first principal responding State. When releases to the UMR main stem will result in significant response by more than one State, or when there is uncertainty as to the responding States, Region 7 will provide OSCs for such releases occurring between Cairo, Illinois, and Keokuk, Iowa (miles 0.0 to 354.5). Region 5 will provide OSCs for such releases above that point.

For spills from shore facilities and non-waterborne sources, OSCs will be provided by the Region in which the source is located.

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EPA Region 5 will provide OSCs for investigating and responding to releases to the main stem of the Red River of the North from its origin in Lake Traverse near Browns Valley, Minnesota, to the Canadian border. All spills to the above-named stretch of the Red River emanating from sources in North Dakota and South Dakota will be handled by Region 8 personnel.

South of the Browns Valley area, the boundary between South Dakota and Minnesota involves the headwaters of the Minnesota River flowing southward. Region 5 Spill Response personnel will respond to releases to the main stem of the Little Minnesota River and Big Stone Lake southward to Ortonville, Minnesota.

All releases to the above-named headwaters of the Minnesota River emanating from sources in South Dakota will be handled by Region 8 personnel; releases from sources in Minnesota will be handled by Region 5 personnel.

EPA Region 8 will provide communications as necessary with the Canadian Province of Manitoba concerning all releases occurring in waters flowing into Canada, including those emanating from Region 5.

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Four USCG Sectors and one Marine Safety Unit (MSU) provide FOSCs for releases occurring within the coastal zone of Federal Region 5, each serving a specific geographic area. These geographic areas are defined as the international boundary with Canada, the boundaries between the units (described at 33 CFR 3.45), and the boundary between the inland zone and the coastal zone. In most locations, the boundary between inland and coastal zones follows the near shore areas adjoining the Great Lakes and the interconnecting rivers.

The following subsections detail, for each of the five units, which tributaries fall within the coastal zone and where a geographic feature, such as a highway, serves as the boundary.

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  1. Conneaut River (Conneaut, Ohio)
    All waters of the Conneaut River to include all adjoining wetlands, shoreline, inlets, and channels upstream to Rt. 2.
  2. Ashtabula River (Ashtabula, Ohio)
    All waters of the Ashtabula River to include all adjoining wetlands, shoreline, inlets and channels upstream to East 5th Street.
  3. Grand River (Fairport Harbor, Ohio)
    All waters of the Grand River to include all adjoining wetlands, shoreline, inlets and channels upstream to the State Route 535, Richmond St Bridge.
  4. Chagrin River (Eastlake, Ohio)
    All waters of the Chagrin River to include all adjoining wetlands, shoreline, inlets and channels upstream to the Lake Shore Blvd Bridge.
  5. Cuyahoga River (Cleveland, Ohio)
    All waters of the Cuyahoga River to include all adjoining wetlands, shoreline, inlets and channels upstream to the Denison Ave Bridge.
  6. Rocky River (Rocky River, Ohio)
    All waters of the Rocky River to include all adjoining wetlands, shoreline, inlets, and channels upstream to the Detroit Rd Bridge.
  7. Black River (Lorain, Ohio:
    All waters of the Black River to include all adjoining wetlands, shoreline, inlets and channels upstream to the turning basin at 41°27.3’N, 082°8.8’W.
  8. Vermilion River (Vermilion, Ohio)
    All waters of the Vermilion River to include all adjoining wetlands, shoreline, inlets and channels upstream to the Rt. 2 Bridge.
  9. Lake Erie:
    With the exception for the geographic boundaries identified for the aforementioned rivers, the waters and adjoining shorelines of Lake Erie within U.S. territory from the Pennsylvania/ Ohio State Line to Barnes Rd at longitude line 82°25′00″ W to include all bays, tributaries and adjoining shorelines.
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Lake Huron North of Saginaw Bay
  1. All U.S. waters south of latitude line 44°43′00″ N following the shoreline down to the Au Sable River.
  2. All waters of the Au Sable River to include all adjoining wetlands, shoreline, inlets, and channels upstream to the Route 23 Bridge.  
  3. Continuing south, following the shoreline, down to the Au Gres River.
  4. All waters of the Au Gres River to include all adjoining wetlands, shoreline, inlets, and channels upstream to the East Huron Rd/Route 23 Bridge.
Saginaw Bay
  1. Continuing south, following the shoreline, down to the Saginaw River.  
  2. All waters of the Saginaw River to include all adjoining wetlands, inlets, and channels upstream to the I-675 Bridge.
  3. Continuing east, following the shoreline, to the Sebewaing River.
  4. All waters of the Sebewaing River to include all adjoining wetlands, shorelines, inlets, and channels upstream to the Route 25 Bridge.
  5. Continuing east, following the shoreline, to the Pigeon River.
  6. All waters of the Pigeon River to include all adjoining wetlands, shorelines, inlets, and channels upstream to the Route 25 Bridge.
Lake Huron East and South of Saginaw Bay
  1. Continuing east, following the shoreline, to Bird Creek.
  2. All waters of Bird Creek to include all adjoining wetlands, shorelines, inlets, and channels upstream to the Spring Street Bridge.
  3. Continuing southeast, following the shoreline, down to the St. Clair River.
St. Clair River
  1. Continuing south, following the shoreline, down to the Black River.
  2. All waters of the Black River to include all adjoining wetlands, shorelines, inlets, and channels upstream to and including the Black River Canal.
  3. Continuing south, following the shoreline, down to the Pine River.
  4. All waters of the Pine River to include all adjoining wetlands, shorelines, inlets, and channels upstream to the CSX Railroad Bridge.
  5. Continuing south, following the shoreline, down to the Belle River.
  6. All waters of the Belle River to include all adjoining wetlands, shorelines, inlets, and channels upstream to the Route 29 Bridge.
  7. Continuing south, following the shoreline, down to Anchor Bay.
Lake St. Clair
  1. Continuing west, following the shoreline, down to the Salt River.
  2. All waters of the Salt River to include all adjoining wetlands, shorelines, inlets, and channels upstream to the Callens Road Bridge.
  3. Continuing south, following the shoreline, down to the Clinton River.
  4. All waters of the Clinton River up to and including the Clinton Spillway and all adjoining wetlands, shorelines, inlets, and channels.
  5. Continuing south, following the shoreline, down to the Milk River.
  6. All waters of the Milk River to include all adjoining wetlands, shoreline, inlets, and channels upstream to the Jefferson Avenue Bridge.
  7. Continuing south, following the shoreline, down to the Detroit River.
Detroit River
  1. Continuing south, following the shoreline, down to the Rouge River.
  2. All waters of the Rouge River to include all adjoining wetlands, inlets, channels, and shorelines upstream to S. Schaefer Highway.
  3. Continuing south, following the shoreline, down to the Ecorse River.
  4. All waters of the Ecorse River to include all adjoining wetlands, shorelines, inlets, and channels upstream to the Jefferson Avenue Bridge.
Lake Erie
  1. Continuing south, following the shoreline, down to the Huron River.
  2. All waters of the Huron River to include all adjoining wetlands, shorelines, inlets, and channels upstream to the Jefferson Avenue Bridge.
  3. Continuing south, following the shoreline, down to Mouille Creek.
  4. All waters of Mouille Creek, to include all adjoining wetlands, inlets, channels and shorelines upstream to U.S. Turnpike Road.
  5. Continuing south, following the shoreline, to Swan Creek.
  6. All waters of Swan Creek (in Michigan) to include all adjoining wetlands, shoreline, inlets, and channels upstream to I-75.
  7. Continuing south, following the shoreline, to the Raisin River.
River Raisin
  1. All waters of the River Raisin to include all adjoining wetlands, shoreline, inlets, and channels upstream to I-75.
  2. Continuing south, following the shoreline, to the Ottawa River.
Ottawa River
  1. All waters of the Ottawa River to include all adjoining wetlands, shoreline, inlets and channels upstream to I-75.
  2. Continuing south, following the shoreline, to the Maumee River.
Maumee River
  1. All waters of the Maumee River to include all adjoining wetlands, inlets, channels, and shorelines upstream to I-75.
  2. Continuing east, following the shoreline, to Otter Creek.
Otter Creek
  1. All waters of Otter Creek to include all adjoining wetlands, inlets, channels, and shorelines upstream to Rt. 2.
  2. Continuing east, following the shoreline, to Driftmeyer Ditch.
Driftmeyer Ditch
  1. All waters of Driftmeyer Ditch to include all adjoining wetlands, inlets, channels, and shorelines upstream to Rt. 2.
  2. Continuing east, following the shoreline, to the Toussaint River.
Toussaint River
  1. All waters of the Toussaint River to include all adjoining wetlands, shoreline, inlets, and channels upstream to Rt. 2.
  2. Continuing east, following the shoreline, to the Portage River.
Portage River
  1. All waters of the Portage River to include all adjoining wetlands, shoreline, inlets, and channels upstream to Rt. 2.
  2. Continuing east, following the shoreline, to Sandusky Bay.
Sandusky Bay
  1. All waters of Sandusky Bay to include all adjoining wetlands, shorelines, inlets, and channels upstream to Rt. 2.
  2. Continuing east, following the shoreline, to the Huron River.
Huron River
  1. All waters of the Huron River to include all adjoining wetlands, shoreline, inlets, and channels upstream to Rt. 2.
  2. Continuing east, following the shoreline, to longitude line 82°25′00″ W.
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  1. All waters of Lake Michigan within Sector Lake Michigan’s COTP zone.
  2. Pike Creek (Kenosha): To the Sixth Avenue Bridge.
  3. Root River (Racine): To the Main Street Bridge.
  4. Oak Creek (Milwaukee): To its mouth.
  5. Kinnickkinnic River (Milwaukee): To the South Kinnickkinnic Avenue Bridge.
  6. Menominee River (Milwaukee): To mile 2 (25th Street Bridge)
  7. Milwaukee River (Milwaukee): To the North Humboldt Avenue Bridge.
  8. Sauk Creek (Port Washington): To the Wisconsin Street Bridge.
  9. Sheboygan River (Sheboygan): To the Pennsylvania Avenue Bridge.
  10. Manitowac River (Manitowac): To the C&NW Railroad Bridge.
  11. West Twin River (Two Rivers): To the 16th and Madison Streets Bridge.
  12. East Twin River (Two Rivers): To the 22nd Street Bridge.
  13. Kewaunee River (Kewaunee): To the Park Street Bridge.
  14. Ahnapee River (Algoma): To the 2nd Street Bridge.
  15. Fox River (Green Bay): To the State Route 172 Bridge.
  16. East River (Green Bay): To the Monroe Avenue Bridge.
  17. Oconto River (Oconto): To the turning basin.
  18. Menominee River (Marinette, Wisconsin to Menominee, Michigan): To the Dunlap Avenue (Highway 41) Bridge.
  19. North Point Marina (Winthrop Harbor, Illinois): Entire marina.
  20. Waukegan Harbor: Entire harbor.
  21. Wilmette Harbor: From the entrance to the sluice gate.
  22. Montrose Harbor (Chicago, Illinois): Entire harbor.
  23. Belmont Harbor (Chicago, Illinois): Entire harbor
  24. Diversey Harbor (Chicago, Illinois): Entire harbor.
  25. Chicago River: The outer harbor, limited to the waters outside the Chicago Lock and retaining walls, including the waters inside the lock gates.
  26. Burnham Park Harbor (Chicago, Illinois): Entire harbor.
  27. 59th Street Harbor (Chicago, Illinois): Entire harbor.
  28. Jackson Park Harbor (Chicago, Illinois): Entire harbor.
  29. Calumet Harbor and River (Chicago, Illinois): From the mouth of the Calumet River south to the north side of O’Brien Lock and Dam, including the waters inside the lock gates. From "The Forks" west to the temporary dike at the south boundary of Lake Calumet.
  30. Hammond Marina: Entire marina.
  31. Indiana Harbor (East Chicago, Indiana): Upstream to Conrail Railroad Bridge.
  32. Pastrick Marina (East Chicago, Indiana): Entire marina.
  33. Buffington Harbor (Gary, Indiana): Entire harbor.
  34. Gary Harbor (Gary, Indiana): Entire harbor.
  35. Burns Harbor (Burns Harbor, Indiana): From the entrance to the south end of deep draft slip.
  36. Michigan City Harbor: Entrance to Bascule Bridge.
  37. Betsie Lake (Frankfort): Entire lake throughout up to and including the mouth of the Betsie River to Highway M-22 bridge.
  38. Arcadia Lake: Entire lake.
  39. Portage Lake: Entire lake.
  40. Manistee Lake (Manistee): Entire lake throughout up to and including the mouth of the Manistee River to Highway M-55 bridge.
  41. Pere Marquette Lake (Ludington): Entire lake throughout up to and including the mouth of the Pere Marquette River to Old U.S. 31 bridge.
  42. Pentwater Lake: Entire lake.
  43. White Lake: Entire lake.
  44. Muskegon/Bear Lake (Muskegon, Michigan): Entire lake throughout, up to and including the Muskegon River to the U.S. 31 bridges.
  45. Mona Lake: Entire lake.
  46. Spring Lake: Entire lake.
  47. Grand River: From the mouth to the end of the dredged channel at Buoy #78 (in Ottawa County approximately 17 miles upstream).
  48. Pigeon Lake: Entire lake up to the fixed bridge in the intake channel of the J.H. Campbell power plant and on the eastern end up to the fixed bridge of Lakeshore Avenue.
  49. Lake Macatawa: Entire lake to the end of the dredged channel marked by buoys #25 and #26 (eastern end of the lake in Holland).
  50. Kalamazoo Lake (Douglas/Saugatuck): Entire lake up to and including the Kalamazoo River to the CSX Railroad bridge, approximately 11 miles upstream.
  51. Black River (South Haven): From the mouth to the U.S. 31 bridge, approximately 2.6 miles upstream.
  52. St. Joseph River (St. Joseph): From the mouth to the Somerleyton bridge, approximately 6.6 miles upstream.
  53. Paw River (Benton Harbor): From the mouth to the CSX Railroad bridge, approximately 3.2 miles upstream.
  54. Galien River: from the mouth to the Highway 12 bridge, approximately 2 miles upstream.
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Eastern Lake Superior
  1. Dead River (Marquette): At its mouth.
  2. Chocolay River (Marquette): At its mouth.
  3. Au Train River (Au Train): Upstream to the M28 Bridge.
  4. Tahquamenon River (Paradise): Upstream to the M123 Bridge.
  5. Waiska River (Brimley): Upstream to the Iroquois Rd/W 6 Mile Rd Bridge
St. Mary’s River
  1. All U.S. waters of the St. Mary’s River.
  2. Charlotte River (Bruce Township): Upstream to the S Scenic Dr Bridge.
  3. Munuscong River (Pickford Township): At its mouth.
  4. Gogomain River (Raber Township): At its mouth.
Lake Michigan eastward from the westernmost AOR boundary to the Straits of Mackinac
  1. Pine River (St. Ignace Township): Upstream to the M134 Bridge.
  2. Lower Millecoquins River (Naubinway): Upstream to the US HWY 2 Bridge.
  3. Manistique River (Manistique): Upstream to the Deer St Bridge (aka The Siphon Bridge).
  4. Boardman River (Traverse City): Upstream to the US31 Bridge.
  5. Elk River (Elk Rapids): Upstream to the US31 Bridge.
  6. Lake Charlevoix, South Arm (East Jordan): Upstream to the Mill St Bridge.
  7. Lake Charlevoix (Boyne City): Upstream to the North Lake St Bridge.
  8. Bear River (Petoskey): Upstream to the Little Traverse Wheelway dam.
Lake Huron northward from the southernmost AOR boundary west to the Straits of Mackinac
  1. Cheboygan River (Cheboygan): Upstream to the US23 Bridge.
  2. Ocqueoc River (Millersburg): At its mouth.
  3. Thunder Bay River (Alpena): Upstream to the 9th Street Dam.
  4. Bare Point and Harbor (Alpena Township): Entire harbor.
  5. Partridge Point and Marina (Alpena Township): Entire marina.
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Within Duluth/Superior Harbor, COTP Duluth will assume the responsibility for providing FOSCs in Duluth/Superior Harbor to the mouths of all small tributary rivers and creeks entering into the harbor, plus the St. Louis River serviced by existing patrols and aids to navigation up to the Highway Bridge on Route 23 at Fond du Lac, Minnesota, and the waters of Lake Superior within COTP Duluth.

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Ordinarily, the Ninth Coast Guard District will not provide the OSC for a release occurring in the inland zone. However, where a Marine Safety Officer responds in the inland zone to a marine casualty or other incident pursuant to USCG port safety and commercial vessel safety responsibilities, that officer will serve as the First Federal Official On Scene, pending arrival of the predesignated EPA OSC. In this capacity, that officer will manage any cleanup actions performed by the responsible party and, if necessary, will initiate a Federal removal.

The EPA Region 5 office may request that the Ninth Coast Guard District provide the OSC for a release in the inland zone, regardless of source, because of the particular circumstances of the incident.

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If the incident involves a commercial vessel, a transfer operation, or a marine transportation related facility, the USCG will provide the OSC. The Eighth District will assist the predesignated EPA OSC where there is a discharge or release of oil or hazardous substances, or a threat of such a discharge or release, into or on navigable waters. Upon request by the EPA OSC, the USCG may act on behalf of US EPA, assuming the functional role and responsibilities of the OSC. If the USCG is the first Federal official on-scene, the USCG will notify the EPA OSC and act as the OSC until such time as the EPA OSC arrives.

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Section 311(j)(4)(C)(viii) of CWA requires that Area Contingency Plans be updated periodically by the Area Committee. For national consistency, it was determined that ACPs would be updated annually for 5 years, starting January 1, 1995, and once every 5 years thereafter. This document may be updated more frequently, as policy changes require.

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NCP sections that refer to the remedial program and National policy statements are not included in the crosswalk.

NCP Citation

Location in RCP/ACP

Subpart A-Introduction

§300.1     Purpose and objectives

Section 1.1

§300.2     Authority and applicability

Section 1.2

§300.3     Scope

Section 1.3

§300.4     Abbreviations

Appendix VII

§300.5     Definitions

Appendix VII

Subpart B—Responsibility and Organization for Response

§300.100     Duties of President delegated to federal agencies

Section 1.2

§300.105     General organization concepts

Section 2.1

§300.110     National Response Team

Section 2.2; Section 2.2.1, Section 2.2.3

§300.115     Regional Response Teams

Section 2.2.2

§300.120     On-scene coordinators: general responsibilities

Section 2.2.1

§300.125     Notification and communications

Section 2.7.1

§300.130     Determinations to initiate response and special conditions

Section 1.1

§300.135     Response operations

Section 2

§300.140     Multi-regional responses

Section 2.5

§300.145     Special teams and other assistance available to OSCs/RPMs

Section 5.1.1

§300.150     Worker health and safety

Section 2.8

§300.155     Public information and community relations

Section 2.7.2

§300.160     Documentation and cost recovery

Section 6

§300.165     OSC reports

Section 2.2.1

§300.170     Federal agency participation

Section 2.2.3

§300.175     Federal agencies: additional responsibilities and assistance

Section 2.2.3

§300.180     State and local participation in response

Section 2.3; Section 2.4

§300.185     Nongovernmental participation

Section 2.8.2

Subpart C-Planning and Preparedness

§300.200     General

Section 1

§300.205     Planning and coordination structure

Section 1.3

§300.210     Federal contingency plans

Section 1.2

§300.211     OPA facility and vessel response plans

Section 1.1

§300.212     Area response drills

Pending

§300.215     Title III local emergency response plans

Section 2.2.3.5, Section 2.3, Section 2.3.2.1, Section 2.4

§300.220     Related Title III issues

Section 2.2.3.5, Section 2.3, Section 2.3.2.1, Section 2.4

Subpart D-Operation Response Phases for Oil Removal

§300.300     Phase I—Discovery or notification

Section 2.1

§300.305     Phase II—Preliminary assessment and initiation of action

Section 2.1

§300.310     Phase III—Containment, countermeasures, cleanup, and disposal

Section 3.2, Section 3.3, Section 3.4, Section 3.6

§300.315     Phase IV—Documentation and cost recovery

Section 6

§300.317     National response priorities

Pending

§300.320     General pattern of response

Section 2.1

§300.322     Response to substantial threats to public health or welfare of the United States

Section 2.1

§300.323     Spills of national significance

Section 3.1.1

§300.324     Response to worst case discharges

Section 3.1.2, Appendix III

§300.335     Funding

Section 6

Subpart E-Hazardous Substance Response

§300.400     General

Section 1.1, Section 2.1

§300.405     Discovery or notification

Section 2.1

§300.410     Removal site evaluation

Section 2.2.1

§300.415     Removal action

Section 3.2, Section 3.3, Section 3.4, Section 3.6

Subpart F-State Involvement in Hazardous Substance Response

§300.525     State involvement in removal actions

Section 2.3

Subpart G-Trustees for Natural Resources

§300.600     Designation of federal trustees

Section 4.1

§300.605     State trustees

Section 4.1.2

§300.610     Indian tribes

Section 4.1.2

§300.612     Foreign trustees

Section 2.6

§300.612     Participation of trustees

Section 4.1.2

Subpart H-Participation by Other Persons

§300.700     Activities by other persons

Section 6

Subpart J-Use of Dispersants and Other Chemicals

§300.900     General

Section 3.2.3

§300.905     NCP Product Schedule

Section 3.2.3

§300.910     Authorization of use

Section 3.2.3.1, Section 3.2.3.2

§300.915     Data requirements

Appendix VI


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